Portaband.com

Tag Archives: woodworking

The Three-Tooth Rule

The Three-Tooth Rule, or How the Number of Teeth Work in a Cut. In order to obtain the best TPI (teeth per inch) for the smoothest cut, follow the three-tooth rule. A minimum of three and a maximum of 24 teeth engaged in a cut. If there are too few teeth in a cut, the blade’s teeth can straddle the work piece and cause the teeth to strip. Too many teeth in a cut may cause the gullets to overload due to there not being enough gullet capacity to hold all of the chips. Along with having teeth strip from the saw blade, blade bounce is …

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , | No comments yet | Bet the first to leave a comment

Bandsaw Blade Gullets

Bandsaw blade gullets are the space or curvature between each individual tooth on a saw blade. With each pass of the blade, the material being cut will curl into the gullet, creating a spiral of material called the chip. Too many teeth in the cut will make the gullet full. The teeth become filled with this excess material, and the chip will eventually break away. Use a variable pitch blade since the alternating pitch created increases and then decreases the chip load inside the cut. One reason to pay attention to gullet size is that with coarser pitch blades, the …

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | No comments yet | Bet the first to leave a comment

Chip Formation and Color

There are various factors that can affect bandsaw efficiency, and using the correct sawing parameters — band speed and feed rates — is one to consider. Knowing about chip formation and color is important to determine the correct use of feed rate. A bandsaw blade’s teeth are razor-sharp, and the result of any cutting process includes the chips produced. They are discarded yet hold a vital clue to the success of any cutting procedure. The bandsaw operator can and should inspect the chips in order to achieve maximum cutting efficiency. Chips are the layers (shavings) of metal removed from the material being cut as …

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | No comments yet | Bet the first to leave a comment

How to Determine Bandsaw Blade Size

When trying to figure out how to determine bandsaw blade size, it is important to know the job that will be performed using that particular saw blade. Things like material, amount, and cut. To help determine the proper bandsaw blade size for a particular machine, follow this formula: For two-wheel bandsaws Adjust the wheels to their correct position (about the middle of the adjustment range) make sure the wheels are not adjusted to the extreme Allow for take-up to tension the band and for possible future blade re-welding. The middle of the adjustment range is best Band length = (R1 x …

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | No comments yet | Bet the first to leave a comment

Safe Bandsaw Operation

Safe Bandsaw Operation is as obvious as it is important for anyone owning and operating equipment that uses sharp objects at fast speeds. Another seemingly obvious statement would be to say that the bandsaw is not a simple machine to be taken lightly. From the small table top variety of bandsaw to the larger, more complex models, the need of sufficient knowledge and skill in operating these machines is essential to maintaining a safe and stress-free work environment. Saw operators are already aware of the fact that there are dangers involved when working with and even near such a machine. One wrong move could lead …

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | No comments yet | Bet the first to leave a comment