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Monthly Archives: November 2014

Vickers Hardness Scale

The Rockwell hardness test measures materials hardness based on the net increase in depth of impression as a load is applied. Hardness numbers have no units, and the higher the number in each of the scales, the harder the material. In the Rockwell method of hardness testing, the depth of penetration of an indenter under certain arbitrary test conditions is determined. Hardness is defined as resistance to local penetration, scratching, machining, wear or abrasion, and yielding. The multiplicity of definitions, and corresponding multiplicity of hardness measuring instruments, together with the lack of a fundamental definition indicate that hardness may not be …

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Rockwell Hardness Scale

Hardness is a materials characteristic and not a fundamental physical property. Knowing the hardness of any metal or alloy is important since hardness value is in correlation to other properties such as materials size and thickness. The Rockwell hardness test is a measurement based on the net increase in depth of impression as a load is applied. Hardness numbers have no units and are commonly given in the R, L, M, E, and K scales. The higher the number in each of the scales means the harder the material. The Rockwell hardness test worldwide adoption likely resulted from the test …

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Sharpening Saw Blades

Sharpening bandsaw blades is a widely known and acceptable practice in both metal and wood cutting industries. It is applied, however, and almost exclusively, to the woodworking set. A primary problem encountered in the woodworking shop is dull saw blades. Objects encountered while cutting wood include nails, bullets, and other similar materials, all of which will help to dull a saw blade. These extractions from green wood cause damage on the edges of sharp teeth. Dull blade teeth aren’t useful and shouldn’t be utilized. Buying a new saw blade is an option, and so is sharpening the dull blade. There are two ways to …

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Kerf and Precise Cut

There are factors to consider when deciding on the right bandsaw blade for the job. Things like the material to be cut, its thickness, bandsaw type, and how it will be used to cut a specific type of material. It is important to consider correct width, pitch, and TPI when purchasing any bandsaw blade. Rake angle, tooth style and set, blade type, and kerf are factors as well. Kerf is the slot made by a cutting tool when parting material — or the amount of material removed by the cut of the blade. The term kerf is mistakenly used to refer to …

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Bandsaw Newbie-Refresher Course

A preventive safety course for bandsaw operators new to the machines as well as for those quite familiar with them. All bandsaw operators should possess adequate knowledge of mechanics, materials, and most important — safety — prior to any cutting procedure. Lack of experience combined with lack of knowledge will jeopardize not only the materials but the machine and worse, the machine operator. Every bandsaw machine offers various operating features, and before using any particular machine, it is important to be familiar and possess a minimum of confidence prior to operating. Aside from possessing thirty+ years of experience in a variety of shops and …

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Feed and Speed Rate Factors

Running saw blades at the correct feed and speed rates is important if the goal is to achieve desirable output. There is an optimum balance between blade speed and feed rate for every saw blade and every material to be cut. Proper adjustment of feed and speed rates will help to maximized blade life and assure a satisfactory cut. Feed rate is determined by the bandsaw, material size and shape, guide spacing, cutting fluid, and tooth size and shape. The greater the blade speed, the greater the feed rate — up to the limits imposed by the above-mentioned production factors. Blade Speed Bandsaw …

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Tube Cutting

Cutting tube is more difficult than sawing solid bars. The bandsaw blade is performing two types of cut, sawing solid as it enters the material then entering the hollow tube. The blade is now cutting two thin solids with a space in between — an interrupted cut. To achieve the best result in cutting tube, blade variables and bandsaw settings have to be carefully selected. Tooth pitch (TPI) is an important variable as well. The number of teeth engaged with the material determines both blade performance and durability. A few teeth in contact with the material can lead to stripped teeth, bending, or premature …

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Diamond-Tipped Bandsaw Blades

A diamond-tipped bandsaw blade has diamond grit on the tip of each tooth. the dust offers added durability and a faster cut on harder materials like agates, opals, stone, and any absolute abrasive materials. Diamond-tipped blades are composed of two basic elements: circular sheet steel and the diamond-impregnated dust. The latter has three different forms: continuous, castellated, and segmented. Diamond-tipped bandsaw blades remain the tool of choice for most machining processes. The diamond dust teeth are coated by electroplating, a process in which an electrical current deposits the coating onto the blade, producing a hard, brittle Ni (Nickel) matrix. The matrix keeps the diamond …

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Double-Weld Bandsaw Blades

Depending on the needs of our customers, Sawblade.com offers welded-to-length bandsaw blades. This process involves cutting the blade to length, welding it, and then annealing the blade. There are rare instances when a bandsaw blade will have two welds instead of just one. If an order for 16’ of bandsaw blade arrives, and the weld shop only has 10’ of band in stock, the manager may feel confident about permitting an employee to take the 10’ band and weld 6’ more provided it is from the same stock. The weld shop may weigh the potential for problems versus waste and loss. The customer has the right to refuse the …

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Making Bandsaw Blades

A bandsaw blade consists of a continuous band of metal with teeth along one edge and used to cut a variety of materials. The band usually rides on two wheels that rotate along the same plane. Some bandsaws may have three or four wheels, depending on the model. The required length of band is cut from a coil and then welded together at both ends. Most weld centers follow the same procedure in creating bandsaw blades. Oil or grease is applied to metals, preventing surface rust. Before the blades are welded, they need to be cleaned using a degreaser agent. …

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