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Monthly Archives: November 2014

Bandsaw Blade Tooth Set

The bending out of the blade’s teeth, left or right, and away from the blade is known as tooth set. It works to give a straighter cut. Tooth set clears the chips from the kerf, allowing the band back to clear the cut without binding or becoming stuck in the material. The set will vary depending on the intended cut. A rip saw has a tooth set similar to the angle used on a chisel, ripping the material apart. A flush-cut saw has no set on one side, allowing the saw to be laid out flat onto a surface and cut without scratching. The set of a blade’s teeth …

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How to Determine Blade Choice

When it comes to making the right bandsaw blade choice, there are several factors to determine prior to purchasing any blade, and depending on the materials being cut. Determine the bandsaw’s condition and the type of band used. Each bandsaw is equipped with wheels that will only accommodate one saw blade width. Bandsaw sizes are unique and commonly referenced as an operator working on a 1.0 or  a .75 saw. It is impossible for one blade to cut all materials. Materials being cut and how they will be cut determine Blade Type. The three main saw blade variables are width, teeth-per-inch (TPI), and the set. …

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Materials Variables

One of the variables to a quality cutting process is materials. The quality of cut can vary depending on a variety of factors, but materials and quality output are something to consider. Blades are built for the type of the materials being cut, the dimension of the materials, and the materials characteristics. Type of material may refer to ferrous or non-ferrous, with ferrous metals being harder since alloys are added during the steel making process. As the cut process completes, alloys become harder with the saw continuously cutting through. These types of materials require stronger blade teeth with smaller tooth gullets if a productive cut is to be achieved. …

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Visit SawBlade.com

SawBlade.com is one of the fastest growing companies selling quality bandsaw blades. If you visit our website, there is detailed information about each blade and added info about usage and type. We offer various shipping options as well as ground and next-day shipping. Ordering bandsaw blades online is straightforward, hassle-free, and completely secure. Buying online is simple by just clicking on the links that provide details about blade size, TPI, blade type, thickness, and length. Bandsaw suppliers create websites to help build recognition and to use this as a marketing tool to attract customers. It is easy for customers to find the products they are looking for …

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The Right Blade for the Right Material

Selecting the right blade for the machine and the materials being cut are important factors to consider when purchasing bandsaw blades. Each blade type has a specific purpose. For cutting wood, it is best to use a carbon blade, which is cost-effective, the bi-metal blades are durable and affordable metal-cutting blades, and the carbide-tipped blade is designed to cut exotic metals and abrasive woods. Know dimensions. The buyer should know the specific material being cut and its thickness. Each bandsaw blade is designed to cut certain types of material. Knowing the material helps in the purchase of the right blade type …

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The Chip Brush

The chip brush is a nondescript equipment piece on both horizontal and vertical bandsaws. They are designed to increase blade performance by keeping the gullets free of debris. The chip brush performs a critical role in the function and lifespan of the blade and the machine. In order to produce a clean cut, clean gullets are necessary. It will reduce blade stripping, wear, and welded chips to the blade teeth. It will eliminate rough cuts and minimize blade bounce. Chip brushes on most bandsaws are mechanical and motor-driven. As the blade passes the spinning steel brush, the brush removes the spiral shaped chips from …

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Keeping Blades Clean

Bandsaw blade maintenance is important for productive output as well as operator safety. A dirty bandsaw blade will dull fast, thus shortening its original lifespan. There are several easy and effective ways for keeping blades clean while guarding against things like build-up and rust. Cleaning bandsaw blades will extend blade life, keep it sharp, and help to avoid stripped teeth and crooked cuts. These are apt to occur with debris build-up in the gullets. It is especially prevalent in smaller shops using smaller, vertical bandsaws that may not be equipped with a chip brush or a cool/lubricate implement built in. Residue is in the pitch, where …

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Gullet Cracks

There is no substitute for a well designed, properly maintained, and fully functioning bandsaw machine. When things go wrong, it is usually due to maintenance having been avoided for any length of time. Avoiding gullet cracks is part of an ideal maintenance procedure. The gullet is the second hardest working bandsaw feature. A properly cleaned gullet is critical to achieving correct cut, appropriate band cooling and lubrication, and for adequate chip removal to occur. Gullet cracking stems from a number of variables, but the likely cause is the machine and not the blade. Band straightness, too tight blade guides, too high blade tension, too heavy a …

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Vibration and Chatter

Vibration, worn wheels, ill-fitted belts, wobbly blades, and shoddy performance are all the result of bandsaw machine equipment neglect, malfunction, or both. They are also known causes of excessive noise in operation. By minimizing these sound issues, work environment is improved while raising bandsaw performance levels. Below are a few causes for excessive machine noise and vibration with possible solutions to the problem. Try switching blades — the raker and an off-set tooth pitch might cut down on squeal due to the left, right, off-set tooth pattern on the blade. Too low a feed rate — increase feed pressure. Check the guides — if they are cool …

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Guide to Saw Blade Guides

Blade guides are important in helping to support the saw blade. Less support is offered if the guides are set too far apart. Too close, and there is a tendency for the blades to break if unable to move freely. Maintaining an equal amount of space within the guides where the blade is held is key. Blade guides are usually a molded piece of carbide or ceramic material fitted close to the bandsaw blade. The guides are adjusted using a knob to raise, lower, or move side to side to accommodate material thickness and saw blade size. Standard bandsaw machines come with saw guides. Their …

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