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Daily Archives: September 17, 2014

The Q701 M71 Bi-Metal Bandsaw Blade

The Q701 M71 Bi-Metal Bandsaw Blade is a bandsaw blade with unique features and use benefits. Bandsaw machine operators have different options when cutting certain types of materials. Carbon blades for wood and plastics, Bi-Metal blades for steels and metals, and Carbide blades for titanium and other exotic alloys. A Bi-Metal blade is capable of cutting hard and exotic alloys, and aside from a Carbide blade, a Bi-Metal blade can also cut hard materials such as Monels and alloys. The M-71 saw blade is a Bi-Metal blade designed to cut materials that the M-42 Bi-Metal blades can’t. The blade is effective at cutting …

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Hi-Lo Bandsaw Blades

A brief post about the Hi-Lo Bandsaw Blades usage and features. Most of the blogs about blades include the proper usage of blades and the appropriate work load that would fit for a specific type of blade. Most of the discussion centers around the carbon and bi-metal blades. These two types of blade are the most commonly used blades in the industry today, but what about the Hi-Lo bandsaw blade? This type of blade is useful and special in many ways. The Hi-Lo is a blade that allows for more types of cutting surfaces and an increased rate of cut. It …

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Creating Bi-Metal Bandsaw Blades

Bi-metal bandsaw blades, as their name suggests, are saw blades that are made of two metals that are welded together. One method of creating this type of blade is known as electron beam welding (EBW), which is a fusion welding process in which a beam of high-velocity electrons is applied to two materials to be joined together. The electron energy heats up on impact, melting the materials. Another method for creating bi-metal blades is with laser beam welding (LBW), a technique used to join multiple pieces of metal using a laser. EBW and LBW both help in creating high-speed steels: alloys that gain their properties from tungsten, …

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Metallurgy and Bandsaw Blades

The study of metallurgy and its impact on bandsaw blades is invaluable knowledge for any machine or woodworking shop employee and key to proper application in any cutting process. To better understand the need-of-use for the different types of saw blades and their effect on different types of materials, a better understanding of the terminology and application becomes more clear. Metallurgy is the study of physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their inter-metallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. Another way of describing it is the way in which science is applied to the production of metals and the engineering of metal …

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Carbide Bandsaws and Blades

Carbide Bandsaw Blades are derived from the carbide saw, a name that originated from a circular saw blade with silver soldered carbide tips. Other names include cold cut, cold circular, cold cut-off, and circular cold saws. The carbide blade nearly replaced solid or segmented high-speed steel (HSS) blades since carbide is much harder than HSS. HSS blades use coolant to keep the surface from over-heating, but the carbide circular saw has a unique geometry of teeth that allows for heat developed during the cutting process to be transferred to and then carried away with the chips. The most common type of carbide …

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Bandsaw Blade Tooth Design

The machining industry uses four different types of bandsaw blade and each bandsaw blade tooth design is unique. Each set is made to correspond with a specific cut and material. The most commonly used tooth styles are the regular (or standard) tooth design and the variable (skip) tooth design. Each has its own specific purpose, with the definitions and usage being described as follows: Standard or Regular Tooth -Rake angle of Zero ° -For cutoff and contour cutting, or general purpose use Variable (Skip) Tooth Style -Same as Standard Tooth Style but with less teeth (every other tooth being removed) -Increased gullet capacity -Good …

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